March 26, 2017

The rise of the Indivisibles

LA Times - The idea started with a public Google document.

In the weeks after Donald Trump won last year’s presidential election and Republicans kept control of Congress, Sarah Dohl, along with a handful of friends and former Capitol Hill colleagues, wanted Americans — mostly distraught Democrats — to know their voices could still be heard.

Not expecting much, they published online a 26-page document in mid-December, outlining a succinct idea: resist.

Its title, “Indivisible: A Practical Guide for Resisting the Trump Agenda,” quickly drew interest. George Takei, the actor who starred in the television series “Star Trek,” tweeted it to his 2.2 million followers. So, too, did former Labor Secretary Robert Reich, who worked in the Clinton administration.
“We just had no idea it would turn into this huge movement,” Dohl, 33, said Saturday from her house in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. “We thought our moms might read it.”

What at first started with a small group of young progressives batting around ideas on how to move forward under a Trump administration has blossomed into a national movement, known as Indivisible. The mission centers on grass-roots advocacy targeting members of Congress inclined to work with the new administration and those who, in Indivisible’s view, don’t do enough to oppose it.

In keeping with the loose structure of other movements such as Black Lives Matter, Indivisible isn’t a hierarchical organization with a national headquarters and local chapters. Instead, it’s a collection of groups committed to the same goal, employing tactics and operating on principles shared by Indivisible’s founders online.

Early on, the focus was attacking Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Members of the movement have caused representatives to flee town halls and, at times, cancel public events altogether. They’ve corralled constituents, visited district offices and made phone calls en masse demanding answers.


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